Chinese to learn: Chinese flower — Shui xian hua水仙花 Chinese sacred lilies, water goddess flowers, or water spirit flower: 邓丽君 – 小小水仙花 Little water goddess flower Deng li jun / Teresa Teng – Xiao xiao shui xian hua: song, children’s song, lyrics, pinyin and English translation

邓丽君 – 小小水仙花 Little water goddess flower
Deng li jun / Teresa Teng – Xiao xiao shui xian hua

小小的水仙花,
Xiao xiao shui xian hua
Little water goddess flower

好象是要说话。
hao xiang shi yao shuo hua
You looks like wanting to say words

你要说什么话,
ni yao shuo shi me hua
What words you want to say

小小的水仙花?
xiao xiao de shui xian hua
Little water goddess flower

小小的水仙花,
xiao xiao de shui xian hua
Little goddess flower

小小的水仙花,
xiao xiao de shui xian hua
Little goddess flower

是不是风吹,
shi bu shi feng chui
Is it about wind blowing

是不是雨打,
shi bu shi yu da
Is it about rain hitting

你有点害怕?
ni you dian hai pa
You have a bit of fear

小小的水仙花,
Xiao xiao de shui xian hua
Little water goddess flower

我不愿离开它
Wo bu yuan li kai ta
I don’t want to leave it

我心里放不下,
Wo xin li fang bu xia
I can’t stop worrying about it

小小的水仙花。
Xiao xiao de shui xian hua
Little water goddess flower

Translated by Shu

Information about Daffodil and Shui xian hua

English: Daffodil
Pinyin: shuǐ xiān
trad: 水仙 Chinese Sacred lily, Water goddess
simp: 水仙 Chinese Sacred lily, Water goddess

The origin story of Daffodil in Greek mythology:
Daffodil is the common English name for Narcissus plant. In Greek mythology it says that a young man called Narcissus who fell in love with his own image reflected in a pool, and as he knelt and gazed into a pool of water that he fell into the water and drowned. In some variations, they say he died of starvation and thirst from just sitting by the edge of the pool until he gave out, gazing at his reflection until he died. In both versions, the daffodil (the Narcissus plant), first sprang from where he died and he was transformed into the flower.

There is an interesting article about the Chinese sacred lilies:
People sometimes call them “sacred lilies,” but the flowers are neither. Their name translates from Chinese as “spirit of the water,” shui xian hua (shway SHE-EN HWA). Chinese people all over the world enjoy them at this time of year. Especially now, the lead up to the Asian spring festival, the beginning of the lunar new year, the second new moon after the solstice, in 2008 February 7th. A photo hardly does justice to their blossoms. And there’s the celestial scent.
You start with bulbs shaped like fists palm up. Getting them to bloom involves a little ritual. First rub away their onionskin-like flakes. Then float them in water for a day and a night. After that you lay a shui xian hua bulb on its back in a bowl, you’ll know which way, three quarters of an inch of water. Put some wet tissue or cotton on the place where the roots are starting. Add some stones in to give it ballast.
Set it the shui xian hua bulb your brightest window. Change the water every couple of days. Once in a while, gently stroke the leaves and stems, often four or five blossom stems from each bulb. When you see the buds, do just the leaves lightly. It’s the caresses that make the difference
In three or four weeks, you’ll see. If it’s your first time, you’ll be amazed. If they’ve had you before, you’ll remember. Three or four weeks depending on how you care for them. Many Chinese people hope that if the shui xian hua blooms right on the new year’s day, the year will be lucky. So if you want the blooming to hold off as you approach the February 18th spring festival, you put your bulbs in the coolest sunny window. A warmer sunny window hastens the blossoming.
Continue reading the article at : http://www.chineseshuixianhua.com/article%20shui%20xian%20hua.html

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